Decades-old New Hampshire homicide mystery has possible Texas ties

Bob Evans
Bob Evans

A man who may have spent time working in Texas and had acquaintances in Austin during the 1970s and 1980s is thought to be connected to a string of homicides in New Hampshire, authorities say.

Since 1985, New Hampshire law enforcement officials, working with the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, have been trying to solve the mystery surrounding the deaths of a woman and three children, whose bodies were found wrapped in plastic and placed in steel barrels in the woods outside Allenstown, N.H.

The victims remain unidentified, but authorities hope to find some answers if they can get more information about a man they think is their killer.

WATCH: Video recaps mysterious case of bodies found in barrels in New Hampshire

According to the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, investigators say DNA has linked one of the victims found in the barrels to a man known as “Bob Evans,” who died in prison in 2010.

Authorities have said Evans “referenced the state of Texas on multiple occasions when speaking of places he spent time during the early 1980s. He told investigators he spent time in Travis, Nueces, Harris, Dallas and Matagorda counties

In Travis County, investigators say Evans might have known someone residing at an RV park in Austin during 1986. He called two RV parks – Austin Lone Star RV Resort and Pecan Grove RV Park, officials said.

Evans also claimed to have worked as an electrician with Brown and Root in Houston during the 1970s; as an installation mechanic at Big Three Industries during the 1970s and 1980s; and as an instrument repairman for Bay City Electric in Bay City during the 1970s.

The family of a missing woman, Denise Beaudin, believe she and Evans left New Hampshire and traveled to Texas to avoid financial difficulties.

More information about the case has been prepared by the New Hampshire Attorney General’s Office, the Manchester Police Department and New Hampshire State Police, and can be obtained by emailing the National Center for Missing and Exploited Children at media@ncmec.org.

 

Unlucky Friday the 13th? Austin DJ Miguel Angel plays show hours after getting stabbed

ulovei-miguel-angel
Austin DJ Miguel Angel, aka ulovei. Photo from Facebook

Austin DJ Miguel Angel, also known as “ulovei,” said he was the victim of a stabbing in East Austin on Friday night but he was still able to play a show just hours later.

Angel chronicled the night on social media, proving the old adage, the show must go on.

Austin police had responded to a stabbing around 9 p.m. Friday in the 800 block of East 14th Street, according a Statesman report. A person with a minor stab wound was taken to the hospital, and police had a suspect in custody after the stabbing, police said.

Angel said he was the victim in that report and has identified his attacker to police and plans to press charges. The Statesman reached out to Austin police, but they were unable to confirm details of the incident Saturday night.

Angel said the incident occurred at his East Austin apartment where he was waiting for a friend so they could go together to a show he was scheduled to play.

He said someone knocked on his door and, thinking it was his friend, he opened it to see a man in a mask with what looked like a samurai sword. “He just started swinging me and attacking,” he said.

Angel said he grabbed the blade with his hands to keep the man from stabbing and slashing him further, but then the attacker pulled out a dagger from behind and stabbed Angel in the back.

The DJ said when his friend, Kirkland Audain, got to his apartment the attacker began running after Audain.

Audain said he was able to get into his car, lock the door and call police. “It’s just surreal,” he said. “He was going to kill my friend if I hadn’t shown up.”

On Friday at 10:48 p.m., Angel posted video and photos of himself on social media at the hospital after he said he was stabbed.

Angel told the Statesman he suffered three stab wounds, including a large stab wound in the back, and multiple injuries to his hands, arms, face and neck. He said he suffered no internal damage from the incident.

 

The DJ also retweeted posts from his friends showing him being treated at University Medical Center Brackenridge.

 

Angel said doctors did not want him to leave the hospital and told him to rest, but he knew he wanted to make it to the show he was scheduled to play.

After getting treated, Angel said he left the hospital around 12:30 a.m. and was able to play the last part of the show.

Around 1:30 a.m., Angel posted a video showing him spinning at The Volestead bar on East 6th Street for a Friday the 13th show with DJ Luis Espada, also known as King Louie.

“I just didn’t want anybody to know that they can keep me down,” he said. “This guy wanted to hurt me (and) wanted to stop me, so I’m not going to let that happen.”

Angel said it was painful to spin at the show due to cuts and fresh wounds on his hands and fingers, but his friends were there to help carry bags and equipment.

Angel said seeing his friends at the gig and playing to the crowd was just what he needed after the traumatic incident.

“I didn’t just want to be at home crying in bed or something. That wouldn’t have helped me,” he said. “It feels good to know that so many people have my back here in Austin.”

Angel said he has received calls, social media messages and texts from friends, acquaintances and people he hasn’t spoken to in years wishing him well after the incident.

https://twitter.com/DamnDtae/status/820352395083481089

He said he planned to DJ two shows Saturday night despite pain in his hands from the recent injuries.

 

 

 

U.S. officials: Fugitive in Victoria Co. vehicular homicide caught in Austin

 

From the Lone Star Fugitive Task Force:

 

AUSTIN, Texas – Hector Garcia, 49, of Austin was arrested yesterday evening by the Lone Star Fugitive Task Force without incident in the 1400 block of Meander in Austin.  Garcia was sought by the Victoria County Sheriff’s Office pursuant to an arrest warrant issued from the Victoria County District Court charging Garcia with Bail Jumping and Failure to Appear.

 

Garcia was previously indicted in 2014 with negligent homicide where the victim, Natalie Luna, 22, mother of two (2) at the time of her death, was hit by a vehicle allegedly driven by Garcia.  Luna subsequently died as a result of her injuries.  Garcia was acquitted in 2015 of criminally negligent homicide in 2015.

 

The 13th Court of Appeals in 2016 reversed certain appellate claims resulting in a new indictment handed down Garcia scheduled for a trial.  Garcia failed to appear for court hearings resulting in his arrest warrants being issued.

 

Garcia will be remanded to the custody of the Travis County Sheriff pending his extradition to Victoria County, Texas.

 

 

Members of the Lone Star Fugitive Task Force in Austin –

Austin Police Department-Tactical Intelligence Unit

Buda, Cedar Park, Kyle, San Marcos Police Department

Travis, Williamson, Caldwell, Hays and Bastrop County Sheriff’s Office

Texas Attorney General’s Office

Texas Department of Criminal Justice OIG

Texas Department of Public Safety

U.S. Immigration & Customs Enforcement

U.S. DHS/Homeland Security Investigations

U.S. Marshals Service

Police say teen who shot self stole gun, a common crime in Austin, report shows

APD personnel investigate at the scene where a 19-year-old man shot himself in police custody in the 500 block of Lavaca Street in downtown Austin on Sunday. DEBORAH CANNON / AMERICAN-STATESMAN
APD personnel investigate at the scene where a 19-year-old man shot himself in police custody in the 500 block of Lavaca Street in downtown Austin on Sunday. DEBORAH CANNON / AMERICAN-STATESMAN

Austin police Chief Brian Manley reported Tuesday that the gun that 19-year-old Zachary Anam had with him when he shot himself while handcuffed in the back of a police vehicle on Sunday was reported stolen in an Austin vehicle burglary last year.

As it turns out, Austin ranks high among some of the cities with the most vehicle gun thefts, according to a recent analysis by the criminal justice website The Trace.

In total, 377 guns were reported stolen from vehicles in Austin in 2015, The Trace reported.

Austin has seen some fluctuations in these numbers year to year, but in general, the city has seen a steady increase in reported gun thefts from vehicles from 2006 to 2015, which mirrors a similar trend in other cities.

Of the 54 cities The Trace analyzed, Austin ranked fourth in total gun thefts from vehicles. Several cities larger than Austin did not respond to the website’s requests for information, including New York City, Houston, Philadelphia, Phoenix and San Antonio.

Many gun owners never report losses and thefts to police, and most stolen firearms are never recovered, The Trace reported. In some cases, owners couldn’t provide their gun’s serial number, which is crucial to helping investigators identify the stolen weapon.

Travis County Jail inmate dies after being hospitalized last week

From the Travis County sheriff’s office:

On December 28, 2016 an inmate notified Corrections Officers of her need to see Jail Medical Staff. The medical professional who examined her determined that she required transport to the hospital. She was immediately transported to the Emergency Room at UMC Brackenridge where she later underwent a medical procedure. On December 29, 2016 while recovering in ICU, the inmate died. Attempts to resuscitate her were unsuccessful and she was pronounced dead at 8:34 am. The inmate is identified as: JACQUELINE KEY, age 55, Transient

Key had been arrested by the Austin Police Department on November 11, 2016 and charged with Possession of a Controlled Substance and a City Ordinance Violation.

Detectives from the Sheriff’s Office Major Crimes Unit and the Internal Affairs Unit are conducting an investigation as is standard practice in these cases. The Travis County Medical Examiner’s Office is also conducting an investigation into cause of death. That determination is pending toxicology results. Detectives do not have any evidence to suggest foul play at this point in the investigation.

DPS on alert for dangerous drivers on Texas roads, offers holiday travel tips

From the Texas Department of Public Safety:

AUSTIN – The Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS) is urging drivers to help make the holidays safer by driving sober and using extra caution. In an effort to protect travelers on our roadways, DPS Troopers, as well as local law enforcement across the state, will conduct traffic patrols throughout the holiday weekends of Dec. 23 – 26 and Dec. 31 – Jan. 1, looking for drunk drivers, speeders, seat belt violators and other dangerous drivers.

“Impaired driving or reckless behavior on the road can turn holiday celebrations into tragedies, and these DPS patrols are designed to help save lives by identifying drivers who disregard the law and endanger others,” said DPS Director Steven McCraw. “By always driving sober, obeying traffic laws, and slowing down or moving over a lane when vehicles are stopped on the side of the road, Texans can help make our roads safer for everyone.”

During the eight-day Christmas/New Year holiday enforcement effort last year, DPS troopers made 466 DWI arrests. DPS enforcement efforts also resulted in 9,174 speeding citations, 893 seat belt/child safety seat citations, 320 fugitive arrests and 286 felony arrests during the enforcement period.

DPS offers the following additional tips for safe travel during the holidays:

  • Don’t drink and drive. Designate a driver or take a cab.
  • Slow down – especially in bad weather, construction areas and heavy traffic.
  • Eliminate distractions, including the use of mobile devices.
  • Buckle up everyone in the vehicle – it’s the law.
  • Slow down or move over for police, fire, EMS and Texas Department of Transportation vehicles and tow trucks that are stopped on the side of the road with emergency lights activated – it’s the law. Also, show the same courtesy to fellow drivers stopped along the road.
  • Don’t drive fatigued.
  • Drive defensively, as holiday travel may present additional challenges.
  • Make sure your vehicle is properly maintained and check the weather forecast before your trip begins.

Austin police seeking volunteers for Blue Santa deliveries on Saturday

From the Austin Police Department:

The Austin Police Operation Blue Santa needs volunteers to join in the fun of delivering packages to families and children starting at 8 a.m. Saturday, December 17, 2016. Those wishing to volunteer do not need to sign up ahead of time; they can pick up packages at the Operation Blue Santa headquarters located at 4101 South Industrial Drive, Suite 260.

This event will occur regardless of the weather.

Volunteers are also needed to deliver packages at the following sites on the same day:

  • Robert T. Martinez Sr. Central East Substation-812 Springdale Road, Austin, TX 78702
  • Jaime Padron North Substation-12425 Lamplight Village Ave., Austin, TX 78758
  • Clinton Hunter South Substation-404 Ralph Ablanedo Dr., Austin, TX 78748

Those going to the remote sites are asked to proceed to the main Operation Blue Santa warehouse after the satellite deliveries are completed. Only a few hundred deliveries will occur from aforementioned substations. Several thousand deliveries will occur at the main warehouse.

Austin Police Operation Blue Santa is a charitable outreach effort created in 1972 by two APD patrol officers who realized that some families in their area would not have gifts or food for their children at Christmas. The distribution began with 20 families from the back of a patrol car. Today, Austin Police Operation Blue Santa serves more than 6,000 families with 14,400 children receiving gifts during the holiday season.

For more information, visit www.bluesanta.org.

North Texas mayor charged with assault in Austin last month

A mayor of a tiny North Texas town, whose pro-marijuana stance led to the resignations of several city officials when he was elected in May, was recently arrested on a charge of assault in Travis County.

Jeremiah Looney
Jeremiah Looney

Jeremiah Looney, a 34-year-old Army vet who serves as the mayor of Whitewright, spent about two hours in jail after he was arrested in October and accused of grabbing his girlfriend by the hair and then shaking her at an Austin motel room, records show. Looney and Whitewright staff declined to say whether his arrest will affect his position in the town with a population of about 1,700 people.

Looney and his lawyer did not respond to requests for comment. In his arrest affidavit, he denies hurting the woman who accused him.

During his campaign, Looney spoke at a Fort Worth rally for the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws. He was medically discharged from the Army for post-traumatic stress disorder and degeneration of the spine, he told those at the rally. The medication he was prescribed didn’t help, he said, and he repeatedly contemplated suicide. But marijuana eased his PTSD and his life-ending thoughts, he told the crowd.

“It saved my life and changed it immensely,” Looney said at the rally, a YouTube video shows.

WATCH: Jeremiah Looney testifies before Texas Senate veterans committee

Looney has stated in interviews with North Texas media that marijuana legalization was never a part of his platform.

Still, when Looney received the majority of votes cast – 175 out of 301 – on May 7, people holding the following positions at Whitewright all resigned the week after he was sworn in: police chief, city secretary, municipal judge, court clerk and the utility clerk, multiple North Texas media reported.

Whitewright City Council members did not respond to an email seeking comment about his arrest, which happened on Oct. 14.

Austin police were called to a La Quinta Inn on 11th Street in East Austin around 11 p.m., according to Looney’s arrest affidavit. Someone called police because they overheard a woman yell “let go of me.”

The woman told police she and Looney were dating, and they had gotten into an argument in one of the motel’s rooms, the affidavit says. Looney called her two different derogatory words for a woman, and she decided to leave.

When she was by the elevators, Looney grabbed her by the back of her hair using both his hands and shook her, she told police.

In the affidavit, Looney said their argument was only verbal, and he did not put his hands on her.

Injured Marble Falls officer resolves assault case with meeting, mercy

A Marble Falls officer who was badly injured in an Independence Day crash with an intoxicated boater sought a meeting with the boater to thank him for his assistance after the crash, according to the Burnet County district attorney.

Still unable to work after suffering a broken shoulder, fractured vertebra, broken ribs, a lacerated spleen and bleeding in his brain, police Capt. Ted Young and his wife, Patricia, proposed a plea deal that means the boater will spend about four months in jail, instead of up to 20 years in prison.

On Oct. 19, Judge Allan Garrett sentenced the boater, James “Hank” Fry, to 10 years in prison, but ultimately suspended that sentence. Instead, Fry will serve 120 days in the Burnet County Jail and 10 years of probation, District Attorney Sonny McAfee said.

In the meeting, Fry apologized to Marble Falls police Capt. Ted Young and his wife, Patricia Young, who was also on the boat at the time, McAfee said. They approved the suspended sentence for Fry.

“Capt. Young has had several serious surgeries following the collision and has not yet been able to return to his full duties as police captain,” McAfee said. “However, those concerns were clearly secondary to their appreciation for assistance after the collision.”

The crash happened July 4, 2015, police have said. Fry ran over the police boat with his boat, striking Capt. Young, who fell into the water. The force of the collision broke Young’s shoulder, fractured a vertebra of his spine, broke several ribs, lacerated his spleen and caused bleeding in his brain.

Fry, along with his wife, drove back to the wrecked police boat, McAfee said. Fry pulled Young from the water and helped get the boat back to the dock.

Fry was found to be intoxicated. After the meeting with the Youngs, Fry accepted the plea deal and pleaded guilty to intoxication assault causing serious bodily injury to a peace officer, McAfee said.

“I certainly appreciate Patricia and Ted Young thinking of this solution, and I appreciate (Fry’s lawyer’s) willingness to not only allow, but to encourage his client and his client’s wife to participate,” McAfee said. “I believe justice was served when Judge Garrett approved the proposed agreement.”

Turn in unused medications to local police, federal agents on Saturday

From the Austin Police Department:
The Drug Enforcement Agency reprises one of its most popular community programs this weekend: National Prescription Drug Take Back Day. On Saturday, Oct. 22, between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. the public can dispose of their unused, unwanted prescription medications at one of 4,700 collection sites nationwide, operated by 3,800 local law enforcement agencies and other community partners. The service is free of charge, no questions asked.

POLITICS OF PAIN SERIES FILE - In this Aug. 5, 2010, file photo, a pharmacy technician poses for a picture with hydrocodone and acetaminophen tablets, also known as Vicodin, at the Oklahoma Hospital Discount Pharmacy in Edmond, Okla. Federal health regulators will bolster warning labels on the most widely used prescription painkillers, part of a multi-pronged federal effort to reverse an epidemic of abuse and death tied to drugs like Vicodin and Percocet, the FDA announced Tuesday, March 22, 2016. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)
AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File

America is experiencing an epidemic of addiction, overdose and death due to abuse of prescription drugs, particularly opioid painkillers. More than 6 million Americans age 12 and over — 2.4 percent of the population — abuse prescription drugs, according to the 2015 National Survey on Drug Use and Health released last month, more than abuse cocaine, heroin, hallucinogens, and methamphetamine combined. Drug overdoses are now the leading cause of injury-related death in the United States, eclipsing deaths from motor vehicle crashes or firearms. The majority of prescription drug abusers report that they obtain their drugs from friends and family, including from the home medicine cabinet.

Last April, during its 11th Take Back Day, the DEA and over 4,200 of its national, tribal and community law enforcement partners collected 893,498 pounds (about 447 tons) of unwanted prescription drugs at almost 5,400 collection sites. Since the program began six years ago, about 6.4 million pounds (about 3,200 tons) of drugs have been collected. That’s more than a quarter pound of pills for each of the 25 million children aged 12 to 17 in America, pills that won’t result in abuse or overdose.

The DEA Austin office, along with the local law enforcement and community coalitions will set up collection sites at the following locations:

Austin

  • Austin High School – 1715 West Cesar Chavez, Austin
  • Barton Creek Square Mall (parking lot) – 2901 S. Capital of Texas Hwy, Austin
  • Household Hazardous Waste Facility – 2514 Center Dr, Austin
  • Planetshakers Austin Church – 1101 Reinli, Austin
  • Travis County Constable – Precinct 2 – 10409 Burnet Road, Austin
  • Travis County Constable – Precinct 5 – 1003 Guadalupe Street, Austin

Other Central Texas locations

  • Buda Police Department – 100 Houston Street, Buda
  • Burnet County Courthouse – 220 South Pierce Street, Burnet
  • Cedar Park Police Department – 911 Quest Parkway, Cedar Park
  • Elgin Police Department – 202 Depot Street, Elgin
  • Jonestown Police Department – 18304 North Park Dr, Jonestown
  • Lakeway Police Department – 104 Cross Creek, Lakeway
  • Lampasas Police Department – 301 East 4th Street, Lampasas
  • Leander Police Department – 705 Leander Drive, Leander
  • Legacy Hills Park Pavillion – 200 Del Webb Blvd., Georgetown
  • Liberty Hill Police Department – 2801 Ranch Road 1869, Liberty Hill
  • Manor Police Department – 402 West Parsons Street, Manor
  • Marble Falls Police Department – 209 Main Street, Marble Falls
  • Round Rock Police Department – 2701 North Mays, Round Rock
  • Smithville City Hall – 317 Main Street, Smithville
  • Taylor City Hall – 400 Porter, Taylor
  • Tractor Supply Company – 441 Texas 71, Bastrop
  • Williamson County Sheriff’s Office – 508 South Rock Street, Georgetown

 

Collection sites across the nation can be found by going to http://www.dea.gov. This site is continuously updated with new take-back locations.